Tammen Treeberry Farm

A family tradition

   Jun 15

Trees

TreesMany families enjoy the tradition and adventure of searching out the perfect Christmas tree and cutting it down themselves.  It is a time to have fun together in the fresh country air.  Some families picnic in our wooded picnic area.  We invite you to share good times together at Tammen Treeberry Farm.

You may choose and cut your own Christmas tree beginning the day after Thanksgiving.  Starting then, we will be open 7 days a week from 8 AM till 4:30 PM.

Tammen Treeberry Farm is one of the largest choose and cut Christmas tree farms in Illinois.  We grow about 160 acres of Christmas trees.  The largest share of the trees that we have growing here are Douglas-fir, Canaan fir, and Fraser fir.

Tree Types

We have Scotch pine and white pine up to 15 feet or so in height.  We have Douglas-fir up to 10 feet or so in height.  The tallest Fraser fir are around 9 feet tall.  We have Canaan fir up to about 8 feet.  The demand for firs has increased in recent years.  We have fewer of them that are large.

Scotch pines have long needles and firm branches.  They hold their needles well and were popular for many years.

White pines have long, soft needles that grow in bundles of five.  They also holds their needles well.

Douglas-firs have short needles.  They grow more slowly than the pines.  Douglas-fir needles are narrower than Fraser fir needles.

Fraser firs resemble balsam firs.  They have short, dark green needles that are flat.  Frasers also grow more slowly than pines.  Frasers are difficult to grow in Illinois.  They will not tolerate either wet or dry conditions.  Our summers are sometimes hotter than they like.  We have a limited supply of Fraser fir.

Canaan firs (pronounced “kuhNAIN”) originate in the Canaan Valley of West Virginia.  Canaan Valley is a particular seed source of bracted balsam fir.  Bracted balsam is a variety of balsam fir.  Canaan firs resemble Fraser firs but tolerate wetter conditions.

Benefits of Cutting Your Own Tree

• Choose the best and know it’s fresh.

• These trees are grown especially for you.  If not for you, they would not be planted and maintained.  The trees help reduce erosion, provide a home for wildlife, and convert carbon dioxide to oxygen.

• These trees are locally grown and support the local economy.

• Real trees are a renewable resource, unlike petroleum.  Plastic artificial trees are made from petroleum.  Real trees can be chipped and the chips used for mulch.

• We plant more than one tree for each tree that is harvested.

• Real trees make scents.

• Though the weather be cold, time spent together with your family to find a Christmas tree will warm your heart and create memories.

Trees2Caring For Your Tree

A Christmas tree is like a bouquet of fresh flowers, it needs water.   Follow these simple steps to keep your real tree fresh, fragrant, and safe throughout the holiday season:

• Trees are thirsty!  To allow your tree to “drink” in the water it needs, cut a slice off the trunk about ¼ inch from the end.

• Put your tree in a water-bearing stand.  Fill the stand with warm water and check it daily or more often.  A tree may use from 2 pints to a gallon of water a day!  If the stand goes dry, a seal will form at the end of the trunk.   A real tree with high moisture content is about as flammable as a damp leaf.

• Research has shown that plain water is best.  No additive has been found that is better than plain water.  Some additives are actually harmful.   Distilled water is no better than tap water.

• If you buy your tree before it will be set up and decorated, store the tree in a cool, sheltered place like a garage, porch, or patio.

• Locate your tree away from heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, space heaters, TV sets, etc.

• Check over all electrical lights, cords, and connections before you decorate the tree.  Don’t overload electrical circuits.  Do not use lights with worn or frayed cords. NEVER use lighted candles or combustible decorations of any kind.

Symbolism of the Christmas Tree

The Christmas tree symbolizes Jesus Christ in several respects:

• The tree points upward — it points us to Christ seated at the right hand of the Father.

• The tree is an evergreen — it reminds us of eternal life.

• The tree is decorated with lights — He is the Light of the world.

• The tree was cut down for us.

Further Information

For more information about Christmas trees, visit the National Christmas Tree Association website and the Illinois Christmas Tree Association website.

We started a Christmas tree blog on August 13, 2005.  To read it, follow the link.